Doctors 2.0 & You Manifesto

Acccording to Wikipedia, a manifesto is a public declaration of principles and intentions, often political in nature. The  Doctors 2.0 TM & You manifesto is not political.  It is a collaborative work in progress.

Our goal is to identify the ways in which the inclusion of health 2.0 tools and social media platforms can improve care and translate this into the words of a manifesto. Our point of reference, is  The Cluetrain Manifestoa set of 95 theses  put forward as a manifesto, or call to action, for all businesses operating within the newly-connected marketplace.

What does Health Care have to do with this? Everything! The Cluetrain Manifesto tells us that the market is the conversation ; the Internet facilitates the bypassing of formal hierarchies creating a more informed marketplace and consumer through those conversations. Substitute “health care” for market place and healthcare organizations for businesses, and we’re ready to move forward!

The list below was collated by Janine Budding. Thank you!

 

 

Doctors 2.0 & You Manifesto in 85 sentences

1. Health is co-creation.

2. Health 2.0 is win-win: care actors are better trained to support a more informed patient.

3. Health 2.0 is a permanent round table between all actors in society for the creation

of a citizenship of health … all members of the same team!

4. Social Media have been widely adopted throughout the world and healthcare; professionals are no different than other people

5. “We are Smarter than Me” in coping with disease.

6.  The Social Web is leading into co-creation of a new participatory medicine

7. Let’s go from the former Isolation of  Illness to the We of the Wellness thanks to hyper connectivity.

8. Physicians should understand the social changes and their changed role in healthcare

systems, (which in many countries are in dire straits) and the emergence of a new breed of

patients.

9. Social media brings an unprecedented ability for people to collaborate continuously

on a global basis. This will enable scientists to quicken the pace of discovery and

research leading to a greater understanding of disease with better treatments faster

than ever before.

10. Social media includes the challenging issue whether the content complies with

regulations. Social media will have to fall in line with the spirit of these regulations.

11. Social media offers us the advantage to reach out across multiple generations of

patients to increase the dissemination of information

12. There is a need for an active and critical role in the digital public space.

13. We need to “Mind the Gap” between social media networks of patients and those of

healthcare professionals. Bridging the gap will bring us a a step further.

14. Patient-centric care  is a hybrid of Internet-based education, mHealth

technologies, telehealth, and provider supervision and visits.

15. The key is that the patient is the source of critical information and engagement.

16. Social medias are primarily used to teach and to learn and hardly at all to treat. Since treating

patients is Healthcare’s core business, these networks have not reached that core yet.

17. Health convos on the Social Web are driven by Generosity and the Joy Factor.

18. The World is flat. Healthcare is now Horizontal.

19. There may be a need for more robust platforms for safe use of SoMe in healthcare.

20. We should not focus on technology too much and we should certainly not use this

argument as a reason to postpone innovation.

21. Diseases, treatments, healthcare actors are now convos on the Social Web

22. Adaptative Darwin Theory is fueling the healing connections at the Social Web;  it´s

not Serendipity, nor forced or guided connections

23. Healthcare Social Networks and online conversations are challenging and transforming

the establishment and status quo of the Healthcare arena controlling the power of

education, professional and patient associations, etc

24. The question is not whether physicians or healthcare opinion leaders have to

use social networks or have to blog, but if they are aware of  the challenges and

social responsibility in these times of epatients, ehealth and never ending online

health information.

25. The huge power of  healthcare conversations will bring down the existing and constricting

regulatory walls

26. A patient is not a diagnosis but a human being in need of compassion.

27. Health 2.0 should improve the quality of exchange and management of patients

when involving all stakeholders; professionals & patients 2.0.

28. Medical professionals of the future have to be team builders between social media,

telemedicine, patients, healthcare providers and healthcare insurance and payers.

29. We need to move from evidence based medicine to science-based medicine and find

a way to bring the latest research directly to the patients, doctors.

30. The Internet is enabling conversations among patients and doctors that were simply

not possible in the era before the mass use of internet.

31. TeleHealth has to be globally acknowledged by medical professionals as a sound

alternative for meeting the patient in his clinic.

32. With the introduction of eHealth, medical professionals have to refrain from income

driven perverse stimuli.

33. The Internet provides us with new ways to bring the latest research directly

to patients and the doctors are co-investigators in the search for the desired

improvement of Health care.

34. These networked conversations are enabling powerful new forms of social

organization and knowledge exchange to emerge.

35. As a result, patients are getting smarter, more informed, more organized.

Participation in their treatment changes healthcare fundamentally.

36. Crowdsourcing patients and doctors have figured out that they get far better

information and support from one another than from books and research. Health

care in co-creation is about adding value to the quality and speed of treatments for

common and rare diseases.

37. “Stop just marketing, Start socializing” Bye Loneliness, Hello Community!

38. Patients who come to the medical appointment with information about their

symptoms  are eager to understand what needs to be done to cure their

disease and are more actively engaged with their doctors.

39. There are no secrets. The networked crowd knows more than a doctor or hospital

does about their own products. And whether their treatment is good or bad, they tell

everyone.

40. “Stop just marketing, Start socializing”

41. The legalistic requirements of EBM, such as its insistence on treatments that have

met the “gold standard” of “well-designed, large-scale, double-blind, randomized,

placebo-controlled, clinical trials”, actually prevent doctors from effectively

diagnosing and treating patients.

42. Social is Healing

43. Imagine a world where every individual had the option to speak to the best doctors in

the world, where getting multiple opinions or an average opinion on a condition was

possible.

44. Collaborative medicine will change the level of care some third world patients

receive

45. The internet had the catalyst role of democratizing medical knowledge that was until a

few years ago only in the realm of health professionals

46. In just a few more years, the distant “voice” of doctors as the sound of the medical

profession will seem as contrived and artificial as the language of the 18th

century French court.

47. The recognition of a problem or situation mostly leads to innovations that have greater

positive impact on a society than high-tech health innovations

48. Healthcare organizations that think it’s enough for a healthcare organization to

just be online misunderstand the  potential of  an optimized mobile

website, for their communication with patients and future patients

49. Health care workers that don’t realize that their markets are now networked person-to-

person, getting smarter as a result and deeply joined in conversation are missing

their best opportunity.

50. Mobile internet access is not a mere fad; widespread adoption of mobile

communications means that an investment in mobile development now can set your

healthcare organization apart.

51. Hospital websites that are optimized for smartphone browsers better attract new

patients

52. Hospital websites that are optimized for smartphone browsers boost their patient

satisfaction scores.

53. Co-creation and transparency are key

54. Medical care should be easily accessible at all reasonable hours

55. A patient must able to get in a doctor’s advice within 48 hours.

56. Social Media and mobile access are the tools to finally share information between

caregivers and care takers and for (big) pharma; the opportunity and obligation to

communicate with patients and doctors instead of pushing their products

on profit focusing stakeholders.

57. Patients can now access a huge amount of high-quality information that

can be used for self-care and to understand when to seek professional care.

58. Access to information will increase a patient’s ability to affect the course of their

disease and decrease their need to use the established healthcare system.

59. A key point for eHealth is the public access and use of the information about health

(diseases, diagnostic, treatments…), but the huge quantity of information to patients

and general public are difficult to interpret, because of the lack of

medical education.

60. Through eHeath information, patients have the ability to access, view, monitor and

communicate with the medical community that can have a profound impact on QOL

scores and have a positive healthcare economic impact

61. Medical information on the internet with a  proportion of  information not applicable to a patient’s specific situation can result in people

believing they are informed when they are not.

62. The internet and eHealth are excellent tools in the hands of healthcare policy makers:

they offer the possibility to quickly adapt to changing scientific and socio-economic

conditions in healthcare

63. Decisions on policies that regulate public health must be submitted to the public, so

that citizens express their opinions freely.

64. The views of citizens on a decision of public health policy must be subjected

to assessment

65. The Internet is the most suitable means to encourage public participation in

evaluating the decisions of public authorities.

66. With the use of eHealth, SoMe, self-management in Health Care, productivity gain

can reach 1 billion  euros

67. eHealth reduces the amount of nurses, doctors, psychiatrists and thus smaller staff

shortages in health care.

68. eHealth limits the growth of health spending: large-scale investment in e-health and

self-management concepts provide significant savings for business and insurances.

69. E-health, telecare and self management are available outside work hours for lower

costs than normal daytime healthcare. Significant productivity gains will be realized.

70. The potential of e-health and self-management is underused.

71. Innovation-Driven Health Care, is health care that develops care in co-creation with

patients

72. One human is  different from the other, the physician should see the person in

front of him in connection to any guideline and not vice versa

73. The internet enables communities to form and people within those communities

to communicate. This enables the support of patients by patients, particularly in

certain disease areas like rare diseases where there may not be anyone with the

disease nearby. And enables the interpretation of the wealth of information based

on personal experience so patients can understand the difference between the

information and misinformation (but it can propagate misinformation). These both

help patients to be more informed and better supported, again without using the

established healthcare systems.

 

74. Smartphones now have more computer power than most medical devices.

75. Smartphones are enabling remote monitoring and investigation. This will change

healthcare by removing the need to visit healthcare centers and enable the

monitoring of a patient’s condition continuously.

76. Smartphones will change the way diseases and their burden on patients are

understood, leading to new treatments and better care.

77. Public Relations does not relate to the public. Healthcare companies are afraid of

communicating with all their patients: happy and unhappy patients

78. Compassion for care is not a parlor trick to pick up.

79. Command-and-control management styles both derive from and reinforce

bureaucracy, power tripping and an overall culture of paranoia.

80. Paranoia kills conversation. That’s its point. And lack of open conversation kills

healthcare organizations.

81. Patients have real power and they know it.

82. Patients like this Health 2.0 much better. In fact, the are co-creating it.

83. Patients have got some ideas for you too: some new skills you need, some better

service and lots of new tools for telecare. New stuff that saves time and money.

84. We know some doctors. They’re pretty cool online. Do you have any more like them?

You’re hiding in hospitals and healthcare institutions? Can they come out and play?

85. When patients have questions they turn to each other for answers. If doctors didn’t

have such a tight paradigm maybe they’d be among the people we’d turn to.

 

 

24 Responses to “Doctors 2.0 & You Manifesto”

  1. October 11, 2011 at 10:05 am, Janine Buddingj said:

    The recognition of a problem or situation mostly lead to innovations that bigger positive impact on a society than high-tech health innovations
    Innovation-Driven Health Care, is a Health Care that devellops care in co-creation with patients

    Reply

  2. October 11, 2011 at 11:38 am, Denise Silber said:

    So, are we possibly off for a list in the manner of Cluetrain Manifesto? Why not! Thanks Janine for a good start.

    Reply

  3. October 12, 2011 at 4:07 pm, Ren said:

    The medical professional of the future has to be a team builder between social media, telemedicine, patients, healthcare providers and healthcare insurances

    eHealth has to be globally acknowledged by medical professionals as a sound alternative for meeting the patient in his clinic. For this they have to refrain from income driven perverse stimuli.

    Evidence Based Medicine requirements for eHealth has to be converted in Business Based Medicine

    Reply

  4. November 05, 2011 at 8:09 pm, Leonard Sender said:

    The adolescent and young adult cancer patients are already embracing the concept of doctor 2.0. We need to move however from evidence based medicine to science based medicine and find a way to bring the latest research directly to the patients in an innovative new way, where the patients and the doctors are co-investigators in the search for the desired improvement

    Reply

    • January 05, 2012 at 12:31 am, kgapo said:

      ?gree with you that EBM cannot be used as the unique tool for treatment decisions. Every human is very much different from the other, and the physician should see the person in front of him in connection to any guidelines and not vice versa. You might be interested to read the article “Every Good Doctor Must Represent the Patient: The Malfunction of Evidence-Based Medicine” by Daniel Scholten, that was published on http://www.orthomolecular.org on Jan. 3, 2012.
      Researchers Steve Hickey and Hilary Roberts argue that the legalistic requirement of EBM, such as its insistence on treatments that have met the “gold standard” of “well-designed, large-scale, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trials”, actually prevent doctors from effectively diagnosing and treating their patients.

      Reply

      • December 08, 2013 at 12:33 am, Adr Born said:

        I was there for the implementation of EBM in the UK for the sake of patient health before the basic lessons were corrupted and forgotten. The US has missed this part of the EBM culture, the most vital and sweeping evidence of all http://clinicalarts.blogspot.mx/2013/12/when-evidence-based-medicine-was-best.html that improved clinical practice. The problem is that its reputation and practice has been tarnished by beancounters abusing it for costcutting rather than health. It is what everybody is getting in US and UK nowadays,
        Perhaps the most important evidence from clinical medicine is that the acumen of a highly skilled and experienced clinician, backed by the wise use of evidence and technology, is the gold standard in medicine. See http://clinicalarts.blogspot.mx/2013/11/the-podium-of-good-clinical-practice.html
        EBM does 2 things. It recommends the best practice for first line treatment in simple, uncomplicated cases which does not exclude therapies that came off second best. Coming second best is no problem but failing in high quality studies is. Too many therapies were accepted on theory or lab evidence but did not work in real life humans. They were accepted on hope and trust in the wonders of anything new. Poor quality studies confirmed this hope and particularly, failed to identify side effects. EBM found many therapies did not work or had totally unacceptable side effects for the positve effects that they caused. It is these therapies that EBM says should not be practiced under any circumstances, not the ones that came second best.

        Reply

  5. November 22, 2011 at 10:33 am, Angel Gonzalez said:

    My thoughts for the Manifesto:

    - Social is Healing
    -

    Reply

  6. November 28, 2011 at 8:49 am, Bart Brandenburg said:

    Social Media have been widely adopted thoughout the world and healthcare professionals are no different than other people in doing so.
    However, ther are a few issues that need to be solved.
    1. SoMe are primarily used to teach and to learn and hardly at all to treat. Since treating patients is Healthcare’s core business, SoMe have not reached that core enough yet.
    2. We need to “Mind the Gap”. There is a gap between SoMe networks of patients and those of healthcare professionals. Bridging the gap will bring us a a step further.
    3. There may be a need for more robust platforms for safe use of SoMe in healthcare. However, we should not focus on technology too much and we should certainly not use this argument as a reason to postpone innovation!

    Reply

  7. November 29, 2011 at 1:14 am, David Lee Scher, MD said:

    It is patient-centric care that is a hybrid of Internet-based education, mHealth technologies, telehealth, and provider supervision and visits. The key is that the patient is the source of critical information and engagement.

    Reply

  8. December 11, 2011 at 7:41 pm, Michaela Endemann said:

    The question is not whether physicians or healthcare opinion leaders have to use social networks or have to blog, but if they are aware of challenges and social responsibility in times of epatients, ehealth and never ending online healthinformation. There is a need of an active and critical role in digital public space.

    Reply

    • January 05, 2012 at 12:44 am, kgapo said:

      Indeed, physicians should get out of their ivory tower and understand the social changes, their role in healthcare systems, that in many countries are in dire straits, the emergence of a new breed of patients. Patients who come to the medical appointment, already basically informed about their symptoms and who are eager to understand more and actively cooperate with their doctors. The internet had the catalyst role of democratising medical knowledge that was till a few years ago only in the realm of health professionals.

      Reply

  9. January 31, 2012 at 11:58 pm, Adebusuyi Adeyemi said:

    Given the relatively low number of healthcare organizations that have actually deployed an optimized mobile website, I

    Reply

  10. February 02, 2012 at 3:54 pm, JP Groot said:

    Co-creation and transparency are key. SoMe and mobile access are the tools to a mean: The goal to finally share information between care givers and care takers, for (big) pharma the opportunity and obligation to communicate with patients and doctors in stead of pushing their products for their on profit focussing stakeholders.

    Reply

  11. February 15, 2012 at 10:14 am, Luis Soldevila said:

    Thanks to everyone for your interesting comments.

    I think there is also one other key point about ehealth that needs to be underlined:
    - The public access and use of the information about health (diseases, diagnostic, treatments…). Internet has brought a huge quantity of information to patients and general public, who often are not instructed in health basis and so are not capable of correctly interpreting what they learn on the web.
    Health professional community, along with governmental administrations and other stakeholders, have the capacity of reconducting this situation.

    Reply

  12. February 28, 2012 at 8:47 pm, Rhonda Soest said:

    Another aspect that should not be ignored is the impact access to eHeath information can have on patients. Particularly those with chronic diseases. The ability to access, view, monitor and communicate with the medical community can have a profound impact on QOL scores and have a positive healthcare economic impact as well.

    Reply

  13. February 29, 2012 at 6:47 pm, kgapo said:

    The internet and ehealth are also two excellent tools in the hands of healthcare policy makers: they offer the possibility to quickly adapt to changing scientific and socio-economic conditions in healthcare. Are however, government bodies and institutions ready to use the potential offered by the internet and web2.0?

    Reply

  14. March 02, 2012 at 8:46 am, Janine Budding said:

    Withe the use of E-health, SoMe, self-management in Health Care, productivity gain can 1 billions euros. It can make care more efficient than it is today. This reduces the nurses, doctors, psychiatrists, etc. needed. In short: smaller staff shortages in health care. Also limits the growth of health spending. Large-scale investment in e-health and self-management concepts provide significant savings for business and insurances. E-health, telecare and self management is available outside work hours for lower costs than normal daytime healthcare. So significant productivity gains will be realized. Still the potential of e-health and self-management is underused.

    Reply

  15. March 10, 2012 at 8:38 pm, kparekh said:

    Social media and all things internet are just tools for achieving wider communications. Imagine a world where every individual had the option to speak to the best doctors in the world, where getting multiple opinions or an average opinion on a condition was possible. Collaboration is big on the web, is it something patients can take advantage of? Could collaborative medicine change the level of care some third world patients receive..?

    Reply

  16. March 13, 2012 at 4:26 pm, Felix Jackson said:

    The ways I think digital tools, apps and social media will change healthcare can be summarised in the following areas. Clearly this is not comprehensive!

    Access to information
    Patients can now access a huge amount of high-quality information. Information that can be used for self-care and to understand when to seek professional care. Increasing a patient’s ability to affect the course of their disease and decreasing their need to use the established healthcare system.

    Access to misinformation
    Unfortunately a substantial proportion of this information is inaccurate or not applicable to a patient’s specific situation. This can result in people believing they are informed when they are not. This can lead to greater morbidity and mortality across patient populations as misinformation is spread (eg the crisis in confidence in MMR vaccine that led to a resurgence of measles and a rise in infant mortality).

    Scientific and professional collaboration
    Social media brings an unprecedented ability for people to collaborate continuously on a global basis. This will enable scientists to quicken the pace of discovery and research leading to a greater understanding of disease with better treatments faster than ever before.

    Community and communication
    The internet enables communities to form and people within those communities to communicate. This enables the support of patients by patients, particularly in certain disease areas like rare diseases where there may not be anyone with the disease nearby. This also enables the interpretation of the wealth of information based on personal experience so patients can understand the difference between the information and misinformation (but it can propagate misinformation). These both help patients to be more informed and better supported, again without using the established healthcare systems.

    Technological advance
    Smartphones now have more computer power than most medical devices. They are enabling remote monitoring and investigation like never before. This will change healthcare by removing the need to visit healthcare centres and enable the monitoring of a patient’s condition continuously. These will change the way diseases and their burden on patients are understood, leading to new treatments and better care.

    We are lucky that the world has now changed for ever. But, it may be a better place to be sick, but there are still too many people who are.

    Reply

  17. March 27, 2012 at 6:47 pm, David Townson said:

    Social media offers us the advantage to reach out across multiple generations of patients to increase the dissemination of information. However, it also represents some challlenges – take for example emerging US regulations regarding physician/pharma interactions: At the heart of the issue is ensuring that the content complies with regulations, etc. Social media will have to fall in line with the spirit of these regulations.

    Reply

  18. May 26, 2012 at 1:35 pm, Janine Budding, MedicalFacts said:

    This is the manifesto Doctors 2.0 deducted from all your responses. Our point of reference, was The Cluetrain Manifesto, a set of 95 theses put forward as a manifesto, or call to action, for all businesses operating within the newly-connected marketplace.
    What does Health Care have to do with this? Everything! The Cluetrain Manifesto tells us that the market is the conversation ; the Internet facilitates the bypassing of formal hierarchies creating a more informed marketplace and consumer through those conversations.

    1. Health is co-creation
    2. Health 2.0 is win-win: care actors are better trained to support a more informed patient.
    3. Health 2.0 as a permanent round table between all actors in society for the creation of a citizenship of health … all members of the same team!
    4. Social Media have been widely adopted throughout the world and healthcare professionals are no different than other people in doing so.
    5.

    Reply

  19. June 04, 2012 at 6:46 pm, Doctors 2.0 and You 2012: Event of the Year « ScienceRoll said:

    [...] from e-patients and doctors to nurses and policy makers. Don’t forget to check out the Manifesto and as usual, here are a few photos from my trip. Cit

    Reply

  20. June 02, 2013 at 12:55 am, Denise Silber said:

    The Manifesto attracts a lot of readers. Add your comments, now!

    Reply

  21. January 04, 2014 at 9:10 am, #HealthXPh tweet chat launched! | The Endocrine Witch said:

    […] referenced the Doctors 2.0 manifesto which had 85 statements. I found two statements particularly compelling for #HealthXPh. Statement […]

    Reply

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